KANSAS CITY – Bon Ami, one of America’s most beloved cleansers, has updated its packaging, for perhaps the third time in a decade or so. This time, their trademark yellow color, present for the last century, has mostly disappeared. The red remains, in a different usage. Most importantly, the chick,MORE HERE

INDIANAPOLIS – There are many who swear by Bar Keeper’s Friend. It’s a safe type of abrasive, based on plants. Bar Keeper’s Friend is great for cleaning copper-bottomed kitchen pans. Its main ingredient is oxalic acid; its distinctive scent just smells like cleanliness. Its mild abrasives clean everything from fiberglassMORE HERE

Even large companies abandon brands in favor of something new. Proctor & Gamble had a predecessor brand to laundry soaps like Tide, Era and Gain, the behemoth detergent brands of today. The brand was Chipso, a flake brand in boxes that promoted the use of safe suds for washing. ItMORE HERE

WALLED LAKE, Michigan – If you have ever purchased ammonia, the oldest and best-known brand is Parsons Household Ammonia, which dates from 1881. That makes it one of the older consumer products in the United States. Today, it has a new life as a sister product to the Brillo pad.MORE HERE

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI – Large consumer products companies like Proctor & Gamble and Colgate Palmolive have sometimes complicated the sale of household products. Endless product line extensions and umpteen variations on products have confused consumers who like the product as it was. Most recently, the trend has been the mixingMORE HERE

Got to love the funny little American brand names that serve small product niches. With these brands, the product markets are small, and so is the competition. Little advertising is needed, and is mostly word of mouth. One such niche is the category of brands that solve unique problems; inMORE HERE

CINCINNATI – This May, Procter & Gamble is offering limited edition, retro-packaged versions of Tide, Bounce and Downy, only available at Target. It’s an amusing promotion that helps to educate younger consumers about Tide’s legacy, while giving older consumers a bit of nostalgia. “Technology has changed how we wash andMORE HERE

At first sight, it seems that our choices for American-made brands are decreasing. Just two big beer brewers, three big cereal companies, and four large laundry detergent makers. Small laundry detergent brands seem to be the most challenged. How can small and local brands survive and even flourish against aMORE HERE

Glamorene was once a top upholstery cleaner; it has since disappeared from American shelves. Such an amusing name. Pictured here, a can from the 1970s or so. Glamorene was originally made by the company Jerclaydon, a company owned by three brothers named Sheldon, Clayton and Jerold Hulsh. Time magazine hasMORE HERE