Nearly every consumer brand gets some play around Christmas, yet some brands are more distinctly associated with Christmas than others. Below, some posts from BrandlandUSA directly relating to Christmas, which is both a religious holiday and a secular consumer tradition. Below, some of the stories in no particular order. ChristmasMORE HERE

A few Christmas stories on our main site, BrandlandUSA: CBS: Bring Back the “Special” Intro Bergdorf’s Still There! New Folgers “Peter” Commercial In Heavy Rotation A&P Has a Fruitcake Strategy Thinking Shiny Brite Ornaments X-mas Trinkets Mean 4-ever Advertising Heat Miser Returns; Shows Value in Rankin Bass Animation Brand TheMORE HERE

For those who like a traditional looking Christmas, there is no substitute to light from incandescent C-7 and C-9 light bulb, and no name more synonymous with Christmas lights than General Electric. One can make the case that the outdoor Christmas light has been one of the greater (and mostMORE HERE

It’s official. We found it. The worst brand extension ever. It’s the Pillsbury Spritz Collection, on sale now at your neighborhood Dollar Tree, right between all the closeout High School Musical crap. The Dollar Tree, of course, only has closeouts and things that either didn’t sell elsewhere, or are brandsMORE HERE

Each year when various Charlie Brown holiday specials arrive on ABC Family, I get a bit confused. Not only are they not on CBS, they are missing the “CBS Special” intro that dates from the Lou Dorfsman era. If you don’t know about the late Lou Dorfsman, he is aMORE HERE

MONTVALE, N.J. – There is but one grocery chain that inspires literature. It’s the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company (NYSE: GAP), this year celebrating its 150th anniversary. In John Updike’s Kennedy-era short story “A&P” a 19-year-old clerk identifies with three scantily clad girls who come into an A&P inMORE HERE

NEW YORK – Each year, as part of Christmas, we pull out a box of Shiny Brite glass ornaments. But each time, there are fewer and fewer. But we keep the box, as it reminds us of another era, when Americans actually made things. Eckardt was a German immigrant whoMORE HERE